Back to Podcasts
How to Listen: Subscribe (it’s free!) in your favorite podcast app.
Oct 5, 2018

If We Took Christianity Seriously! Prayer

Jeff Cavins

What if we really took Christianity seriously and lived out the teachings of Christ? When it comes to prayer Jesus said, “When two or three gather in my name I am there among them” (Matthew 18:20). If we really believed this, how would we pray? How would we live our lives, knowing that God was with us in prayer? Jeff zeros in on what we can learn from the Our Father in today’s episode.

The Great Adventure Catholic Bible is sold out, but more are being printed right now! To be alerted as soon as this Bible is available again, click here.

 

Snippet from the Show

As children of God, prayer takes on two fundamental dispositions: First, the desire to become like God, and second, a humble and trusting heart that enables us to turn and become like children.


SHOWNOTES

Our Father

(9:20) – “Our Father, who art in heaven”

Seven Petitions

(12:05) – “Hallowed be thy name”

(13:10) – “Thy kingdom come”

(14:07) – “Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven”

(15:00) – “Give us this day our daily bread”

(20:23) – “And forgive us our tresspasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us”

(24:25) – “And lead us not into temptation”

(26:05) – “But deliver us from evil”

Catechism of the Catholic Church

2804 – The first series of petitions carries us toward him, for his own sake: thy name, thy kingdom, thy will! It is characteristic of love to think first of the one whom we love. In none of the three petitions do we mention ourselves; the burning desire, even anguish, of the beloved Son for his Father’s glory seizes us: “hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done….” These three supplications were already answered in the saving sacrifice of Christ, but they are henceforth directed in hope toward their final fulfillment, for God is not yet all in all.

2826 – By prayer we can discern “what is the will of God” and obtain the endurance to do it. Jesus teaches us that one enters the kingdom of heaven not by speaking words, but by doing “the will of my Father in heaven.”