Redeeming Reformation Day: Part 2 (The Father Wound)

As a Protestant, I began researching the Reformation under duress of the repeating cycle of division and church splitting I experienced, both as a ministry leader and church member. Right away I was struck by two things: the biblical parallels in the Protestant split to the Great Sin of Israel, and Martin Luther’s father wound. … Continued

Redeeming Reformation Day: Part 1 (The Division of Israel)

As a Protestant, I began researching the Reformation under duress of the repeating cycle of division and church splitting I experienced, both as a ministry leader and church member. During that research I was struck by two things: Martin Luther’s father wound and the similarities between the Protestant split and the Great Sin of Israel. Division, the … Continued

Is This the End of the World? Maybe.

The end of the world has been a main subject in countless stories and even religions. But is the end really near?  Fr. John Anthony Boughton, CFR, has some thought-provoking answers. Karol Wojtyla, before becoming Pope John Paul II said in 1979: “We are now standing in the face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity … Continued

The One True Church: Part 1

When my wife and I were newlyweds and had just rented our first place, we were fortunate to find a friendly and vibrant parish nearby with a very evangelical pastor. Yes, he was Catholic! Maybe a better word would be “evangelistic”, and that’s because he understood the call our Lord Jesus gives us, reiterated by … Continued

Scripture & Tradition: From Jewish Roots

It is an all too common occurrence, Catholics leaving the Church because one well-intended Bible-believing Christian challenged their faith by asking one question, “Where is that in the Bible?” Suddenly, the scope of truth has been confined to a single book, the Bible, without either party realizing that they have bought into a collection of … Continued

The Importance of Studying Your Faith

We prefer giving our attention to earthly things, we are confident in our abilities, and we resist studying the ineffable God for fear of being dumbfounded.

The ’12 Days of Christmas’ Isn’t a Secret Catechism. Here’s Why We Should Claim It Anyway.

Fact and Theory Posts about the Catholic meaning of “The Twelve Days of Christmas” is a carol tradition as fashionable as memes disparaging “Mary Did You Know”.  The theory is this: during the Reformation, persecuted English Catholics wrote the song to teach their children the catechism. The partridge in the pear tree was Jesus, the … Continued

6 Catholic Orders that Shaped Monasticism

The Catholic Church has always had men and women who removed themselves from society to dedicate their lives to God. The earliest lived as hermits, some even living on top of poles to find solitude. As our Church has grown, so have her needs. Holy men and women have founded orders throughout Catholic history to … Continued

10 Steps to Help in the Evangelizing of Protestants

In these days of great cultural and ecclesiastical decline, we need all the faithful Catholics we can get. Protestant converts to the Catholic Faith can be a great encouragement to the Church and help us see afresh the familiar features of the Faith. They can also be reinforcements in the defense of the Faith. We … Continued

6 Inspirational Stories about the Rosary

October is the month of the Rosary. The Rosary is so much more than just a string of beads; it’s a weapon, a communication device, and a portable retreat. There’s a reason it’s been a fixture in Catholic culture for centuries.  I’m the type of Catholic who knows the Rosary is important, but struggles to … Continued

What ‘Liturgy’ Really Means

When I entered the Catholic Church, one family member voiced a concern about worshipping God through liturgy. The concern was twofold: First, this individual worried that the structure of the liturgy was stifling, keeping people from offering God the genuine or sincere praise that springs spontaneously from one’s heart and mind. Why say someone else’s … Continued

St. John Henry Newman and His Critique of Modern Ideas

On the Feast of Corpus Christi, in a tiny chapel in St. Mary’s House nestled in Old Aberdeen, Scotland, just down the cobblestone road from the medieval Cathedral of St. Machar with its iconic towers and rare heraldic ceiling, my family and I were received into the Catholic Church. Amidst his homily, the bishop of … Continued
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