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Dec 1, 2020

Do You Want to Be Happy? Practice These 4 Things

Dr. Edward Sri

There are four virtues that every human person needs to live a happy and successful life- prudence, temperance, courage and justice. Today, Dr. Sri explains how these cardinal virtues allow us to flourish in our careers, personal goals, and relationships. 

Snippet from the Show

Prudence, temperance, courage and justice are the four cardinal virtues that set us free to pursue the good.


Shownotes

The word “cardinal” is rooted in the latin word for “hinge”

  • Prudence helps us to make practical decisions in light of larger principles and goals. It entails making decisions with the end in mind. It helps us to do the right thing,in the right way, at the right time. It is considered the foundation of all of the virtues
  • Justice is giving others their due. Following through on my responsibilities that I owe to God, to my fellow citizens, my family, my co-workers, my spouse, and my children. Justice is outward looking, not inward looking. It looks at the common good, not just our own private good. 
  • Courage/fortitude allows us to persevere when we face difficulties, it moderates our fear of suffering, discomfort, and trials. It gives us the strength to make sacrifices in order to accomplish what we set out to do. 
  • Temperance moderates our attraction to pleasure, and allows us to control our passions. 

The Catechism of the Catholic Church: The Cardinal Virtues 

CCC1805- Four virtues play a pivotal role and accordingly are called “cardinal”; all the others are grouped around them. They are: prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance. “If anyone loves righteousness, [Wisdom’s] labors are virtues; for she teaches temperance and prudence, justice, and courage.”These virtues are praised under other names in many passages of Scripture.

CCC 1806 Prudence is the virtue that disposes practical reason to discern our true good in every circumstance and to choose the right means of achieving it; “the prudent man looks where he is going.”65 “Keep sane and sober for your prayers.”66 Prudence is “right reason in action,” writes St. Thomas Aquinas, following Aristotle.67 It is not to be confused with timidity or fear, nor with duplicity or dissimulation. It is called auriga virtutum (the charioteer of the virtues); it guides the other virtues by setting rule and measure. It is prudence that immediately guides the judgment of conscience. The prudent man determines and directs his conduct in accordance with this judgment. With the help of this virtue we apply moral principles to particular cases without error and overcome doubts about the good to achieve and the evil to avoid.

CCC 1807 Justice is the moral virtue that consists in the constant and firm will to give their due to God and neighbor. Justice toward God is called the “virtue of religion.” Justice toward men disposes one to respect the rights of each and to establish in human relationships the harmony that promotes equity with regard to persons and to the common good. The just man, often mentioned in the Sacred Scriptures, is distinguished by habitual right thinking and the uprightness of his conduct toward his neighbor. “You shall not be partial to the poor or defer to the great, but in righteousness shall you judge your neighbor.”68 “Masters, treat your slaves justly and fairly, knowing that you also have a Master in heaven.”69

CCC 1808 Fortitude is the moral virtue that ensures firmness in difficulties and constancy in the pursuit of the good. It strengthens the resolve to resist temptations and to overcome obstacles in the moral life. The virtue of fortitude enables one to conquer fear, even fear of death, and to face trials and persecutions. It disposes one even to renounce and sacrifice his life in defense of a just cause. “The Lord is my strength and my song.”70 “In the world you have tribulation; but be of good cheer, I have overcome the world.”71

CCC 1809Temperance is the moral virtue that moderates the attraction of pleasures and provides balance in the use of created goods. It ensures the will’s mastery over instincts and keeps desires within the limits of what is honorable. The temperate person directs the sensitive appetites toward what is good and maintains a healthy discretion: “Do not follow your inclination and strength, walking according to the desires of your heart.”72 Temperance is often praised in the Old Testament: “Do not follow your base desires, but restrain your appetites.”73 In the New Testament it is called “moderation” or “sobriety.” We ought “to live sober, upright, and godly lives in this world.”

Resources

  • Visit Dr. Sri’s website at https://edwardsri.com/ 
  • Subscribe to our show by texting “allthingscatholic” to 33-777
  • Find more of Dr. Sri’s episodes at ascensionpress.com/allthingscatholic
  • Ascension is pleased to offer our new and improved online bible study programs and sacramental preparation programs digitally to help you minister with flexibility. Go to ascensionpress.com to view all our offerings!

Meet Your Host: Dr. Edward Sri

Dr. Sri is a theologian and the author of several best-selling books. He holds a doctorate from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome. A founding leader of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS), Dr. Sri currently serves as its vice president of formation. He appears regularly on EWTN and resides in Colorado with his wife, Elizabeth, and their eight children.

 

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